And then there were five

I keep mentioning the dogs as I seem to spend so much time with them, at least two hours a day walking them, if not more, especially now I have lots of free time!

I think I’ve also mentioned in the past that I am in a minority in the village, not because I’m English; although that does count, but because I take the dogs for a walk. I’m sure I’m still a novelty to some of the villagers who come outside to greet me and ‘chat with the English guy’ as I walk past their property; of course the chat is a simple ‘dzien dobry’ (hello) and possibly a comment on how cold it is ‘zimno’. occasionally I may find myself at the end of a incomprehensible question, but I’m getting good at reading the expression on the persons face and answering with the expected tak or nie (yes or no) with a smile  and as long as I get a smile back I know I have given the right reply.

Unfortunately when I do take the hounds for a walk they insist on sharing their excitement with everybody and there barking and baying  can be heard for miles around, which has started to attract a certain element of free spirited dogs, and by the time I reach the first field I’m joined by one if not two additional pets who have decided to join in the pack as we head off towards the forest.

Not that I mind really, it’s quite entertaining, watching them play and having fun; there is the occasional fall out, but the pecking order seems to have settled down and they all pee in succession to show there place on the ladder, never varying in the order. Of course Jackie remains the boss and ignores them all, only interested in finding pheasants and beating the world speed record for a spaniel following a scent; occasionally she is followed and sometimes joined in the chase once she has flushed a bird from cover, but by enlarge the rest of the clan keep themselves entertained play fighting with each other.

Thankfully I have only one real road to cross, directly outside of the house, and then it’s a short walk to open fields leading into woodland as I go further; with a network of tracks and paths providing me with some variation in scenery and distance as I search for the latest evidence of the battle of the beavers.

In checking the routes I take on Google Earth I surprised myself with the distance I’m covering and a four mile walk is not unusual, sometimes reaching six or seven depending on my mood..and the weather.  It’s almost like having a full time job, if only I could trace the owners of the stray dogs, I could charge them for dog walking 🙂

Walking the dogs

Posted in Life in Poland, Nature and tagged , , .

4 Comments

  1. Our dogs take us on a 3+ mile walk before work every morning rain or shine. There is no way we can skip the walk because they look forward to it so much. You’re a good guy to take them out even when it’s so cold.

  2. It can get a bit hectic at times, but if they start to fight I let them get on with it; they soon stop and follow me once they have had their tiff and see me a mile down the road! They all run free except for Jackie who hasn’t developed any road sense so she gets the green cross code treatment and is on the lead for the first 20 yards, then she’s off!

  3. Your Polish dog walking experience sounds familiar. WhenI lived in Portugal we adopted a local car-chasing stray ‘Hoover’, I used to walk him on the lead, much to the neighbours amusement. Unfortunately, this meant he would also scrap with other dogs while on the lead and one day while I was talking to my neighbour, his dog (and Hoover’s Nemesis) ran out, they had a massive fight, Hoover got first prize, coming away with most of the other dog’s ear in his mouth – all while on the lead. It was most embarrassing. Hope you can avoid such incidents!

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